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Everyone has an interest in exaggeration

Carl Heneghan
Last edited 7th April 2011

Think about health care communication to the public. Is it done well, does it lead to informed choice? Do you feel skeptical about the issue, and disillusioned with the current status of communication of health to a wider audience.

Today, at Kellogg College, at the University of Oxford a workshop on ‘Enhancing the Public Understanding of Health Research’ aimed to bring together folk with experience in developing and evaluating materials to help people become better users of health research. The question is, why isn’t the public informed? The two issues when we are faced with research findings, whether it be on TV, in the newspapers or in a scientific journal, are ‘Why should I believe these results,” and “What do they mean?”

Steve Woolshin and Lisa Schwarz authors of the ‘Know Your Chances’ book, talked enthusiastically, and with an array of examples, of the bigger picture and what is out there.

The issue that caught my eye was how invested we all are in exaggeration: manufacturers to sell products, academics to get their research published, journals to get their research cited and picked up by the news and for media to gain more advertising revenue. And so the cycle goes on.

For instance, Dannon's Activia, exaggerated health claims led to a US $21M fine, a further example is a study which suggests, ‘nutrient enhanced water drinks are ''''expensive lolly waters'''' with exaggerated health claims’. All sorts of exaggerations occur on a daily basis ‘Radiation health fears exaggerated, claims Oxford professor’. Just try googling ‘exaggerated health claims’.

My favourite is vitamin D which has reached rock-star status in recent years, as a potential cure for the prevention of everything.

The BBC even highlights medical journals are all part of the exaggeration phenomena: ‘Medical journals have been accused of hyping up the findings of the research that they publish.’

Am I prone to exaggeration, you bet I am! Obviously this is the best site worldwide to find the opinion on the evidence to trust.

The ALOIS Community project

Hi. Unfortunately this workshop was fully booked by the time I heard about it.

You and your readers might be interested in my Cochrane-NHS engagement project which is all about enhancing the public understanding of health research.

This link gives a bit of basic information about the project www.aloiscommunity.org

I have also just produced a pilot episode of an online course - Making Sense of the Evidence in Dementia

http://aloiscommunity.org/dev/sites/default/files/Unit_1/player.html

We hope that if this approach to engaging the public takes off, the online materials can be adapted using appropriate examples, for patient and carer groups and healthcare professionals in other disease areas.

Email me if you would like any further information
caroline.struthers@ndm.ox.ac.uk

Twitter TrustTheEvidence.net

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